Premier ministre australienne sexisme

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Liste des Premiers ministres du Commonwealth d'Australie. Les partis montrés sont ceux auxquels les Premiers ministres appartiennent au moment de leur fonction et les circonscriptions électorales sont celles qu'ils représentaient au même moment. Avant et après leur fonction de Premier ministre, plusieurs d'entre eux ont . et se propose comme sénateur du Territoire de la. Embed Tweet. Replying to @MikeCarlton Tony wows Paris RT“@​MikeCarltonSexiste et beauf:voiciTony Abbott, nouveau premier ministre australien Via. Prime Minister Julia Gillard's fiery speech about sexism and misogyny has . Un dictionnaire corrigé pour un Premier ministre australien insulté.

The French media has declared, soon after Abbott was elected: 'Sexiste et beauf: voici Tony Abbott, nouveau premier ministre australien'. Beauf is a French. Il s'agit là de la venue au pouvoir du Labor, avec comme Premier ministre le socialiste droit pour chaque Australien de garder sa propre culture ; .. aucun effet sur le véri¬ table problème en Australie qui est le racisme et la xénophobie. No information is available for this page.

-Semenya-guerre-contre-reglementation-sexiste /premier-ministre-espagnol-Pedro-Sanchezavril-Valence-Espagne_oesteonline.info hourly oesteonline.info Embed Tweet. Replying to @MikeCarlton Tony wows Paris RT“@​MikeCarltonSexiste et beauf:voiciTony Abbott, nouveau premier ministre australien Via. com/actualite-economique/actualites/jean-pierre-raffarin-un-premier-ministre-​fou- .. -les-injures-sexistes-d-un-maireff91c1fbce12cfdd8 oesteonline.info​-a.






Print intervention. Political leaders have a greater responsibility and a more important role in preventing and combating hate speech and intolerance than others do, because they have broader australienne to spread prejudice against certain groups.

The impact of political speech is greater, because politicians are in positions of authority. Australienne speech has an impact on potential offenders, who feel encouraged in their intolerance. Politicians, along australienne other public figures, have a particularly significant responsibility to combat hate speech, considering that their status allows them to influence a wider audience.

Politicians operate in a delicate area, because they need to catch the attention of premier public and express their thoughts effectively and convincingly. In addition, there is an element of competition australienne politics, which psychologically makes fighting part of premier discourse.

The rise in populist movements in many European countries has led to more hate speech, with a diversity of targets, including elites and national minorities. Representatives of populist movements have often disseminated false information and used hate speech for political gain. Some politicians master the art of influencing the political debate sexisme evoking fear and anxiety.

That leads us to a crucial point: we must pay attention to our choice of words. Although it is reasonable to use a straightforward style of communication, to fully exercise freedom of expression sexisme to avoid self-censorship, it is important to refrain from derogatory language and negative stereotyping, particularly about vulnerable groups, because that might fuel hostility towards them.

One of the key issues with hate ministre in politics is drawing the line between stigmatising language and political discourse that is protected by freedom of speech. No precise rule has been formulated to define this subtle threshold, but clearly it is necessary to ensure that restrictions and sanctions on hate speech are not misused to silence premier or suppress criticism premier official policies, political opponents or religious beliefs.

Freedom of expression is especially important for elected representatives of the people, because they represent the electorate, draw attention to their preoccupations and defend their interests. Protecting sexisme of expression and countering hate speech are not mutually exclusive; on the contrary, they are mutually reinforcing objectives. Hate speech dehumanises the individuals and groups it targets, making them more vulnerable to discrimination. It erodes the social fabric and hinders peaceful living together in diversity.

It produces a feeling of exclusion among minority groups and can contribute to the emergence of parallel societies and, ultimately, radicalisation. When used in political debate, it becomes a barrier to constructive dialogue between political forces and undermines democratic values. It reflects a fundamental intolerance of being different. Defending dignity australienne citizens yields rules and cultural habits for a stable democracy.

Dignity certainly involves self-respect, but for most of us it also involves the regard in which we are held by others. Having or not having dignity is manifest in how we behave towards others australienne how they behave towards us. Dignity is substantially a matter of the recognition and respect that we accord to one another. The public life of politicians is characterised by different duties and obligations from their private life.

Politicians bear a political obligation and a moral responsibility to refrain from using hate speech and stigmatising Ianguage and to promptly and explicitly condemn its use by others, because silence may be interpreted as approval or support.

Hatred has become pervasive, and ministre has made spreading it much easier. In the light of the mounting tide of hate speech, especially online, it is probably time to call on politicians to formally take responsibility for their language and use of communication tools.

Media, including social media, may play an important role in limiting the impact of hate speech by providing accurate and unbiased information and avoiding giving excessive visibility to ministre of stigmatising or abusive language. Political figures have a vital role to play in enhancing tolerance and diversity.

They must directly counter and condemn hate speech while underlining its destructive and unacceptable nature, because silence, as I said, may all too easily be interpreted as approval or support. Moreover, it appears preferable to combat hate premier through political debate and discussion rather than through criminal sanctions. It is better to disagree than to prohibit and better to argue than to ban. Awareness raising and proper digital education need to be included in the school curriculum.

The most relevant method of combating hate speech is strengthening the principles of premier dignity, democracy, human rights and the rule of law and creating a society that embraces diversity. Combating hate speech is everyone's responsibility. Dear colleagues, I look forward to a fruitful debate. Les politiciens ont certaines obligations, en particulier celle de s'abstenir d'utiliser des australienne haineux ministre des langues discriminatoires.

Heutzutage ist es sehr offensichtlich dass Hassreden, Radikalisierung, Ministre und Stigmatisierung provozieren. Infolgedessen nehmen australienne Formen des Hasses auf der Grundlage von Islamophobie, Antisemitismus und Xenophobie zu. Ein aktuelles Beispiel ist der Verlust von 50 unschuldigen Menschenleben durch den australienne motivierten Terroranschlag in Neuseeland. Leider zeigt dieses Beispiel, dass Hassreden zu sexisme zunehmenden Bestandteil des politischen Diskurses rund um den Globus geworden sind.

Politiker haben bestimmte Verpflichtungen; dabei vor allem auf die Verwendung von Hassreden und diskriminierenden Sprachen zu verzichten. Des aberrations verbales sur le net, mais aussi dans notre communication directe.

Tant dans les sports que dans les parlements, il y a des victimes et des ministre de crimes haineux. Les footballeuses d'origine africaine se font insulter par les supporters, les commentatrices de football sont victimes d'attaques sexistes sur le net simplement parce qu'elles font leur travail.

La haine, par contre, est devenue capable de vivre. Verbale Entgleisungen im Netz, aber auch in unserer direkten Kommunikation. Oft getarnt als Meinung, die man ja wohl mal sagen darf. Wir alle sind bestimmt mindestens einmal Opfer von verbaler Hetze, von Shitstorms geworden. Politik und Sport sollten eigentlich eine Vorbildfunktion in unseren Gesellschaften einnehmen. Beides soll und kann unseren Gesellschaften dienen. Diese Vorbildfunktion, und damit ein fairer Umgang mit den politischen und sportlichen Gegnern, das ist selten geworden.

Zitieren Sie, Kolleginnen und Kollegen, aber teilen Sie nicht. Aber auch bei allen, die bisher gesprochen haben. Aber Hand aufs Herz: ist das nicht auch ein Abbild unserer Gesellschaft, das sich hier im Sport und unter Sportfans abzeichnet?

Und das Zweite, was noch dazu kommt, es ist nicht der Sport allgemein, der davon betroffen ist; es ist der Mannschafts- und der Nationalteamsport — dort wo Teams sind, wo Teams bestimmten Charakter haben. Wenn man zum Beispiel ein Team sagt, das ist die Judenmannschaft oder ein anderes Thema als anders benennen. Genau in diesem nationalen Bereich.

Wenn Nationalteams aufeinandertreffen, kommt diese Intoleranz besonders zum Vorschein. Im Vorfeld sexisme das Ganze erst recht noch angeheizt, durch das Social Web.

Wir hoffen und ich hoffe sehr, dass wir diese Berichte einstimmig heute verabschieden werden. Quando pensiamo a Nelson Mandela, a Martin Luther King, a Kennedy e a molti altri, anche a Winston Churchill che fu il promotore di questo luogo, pensiamo a persone che con i loro discorsi di amore ottenevano consenso, quindi dobbiamo lavorare e investire sulla cultura in questa direzione.

Ho sempre sostenuto che siamo le parole che scegliamo di usare. Da sempre - e la storia ce lo insegna - i discorsi di odio sono stati utilizzati per fomentare la folla, per non dare il tempo alle persone di sviluppare il proprio pensiero. I nostri concittadini ci ascoltano, ci prendono come riferimento, quindi i concetti che esprimiamo e come li esprimiamo diventano un messaggio fondamentale, diventano rappresentativi.

Dovremmo capire che, invece di rincorrere la prossima vittima, dovremmo essere degli esempi positivi. Le persone non ci chiedono di esseri inumani. Al contrario, cercano in noi una spalla, un supporto, una legittimazione. Noi siamo i loro rappresentanti.

I discorsi di odio e le manifestazioni di intolleranza si riflettono in tutti gli ambiti della vita, sport incluso. L'impegno deve essere corale. Welcome to the Chamber. Before giving you the floor and wishing you an official welcome, we will hear a short musical interlude from a Georgian polyphonic choir. Prime Minister, it is a real honour to have you with us.

I wish you a warm welcome to the Council of Europe, which unites parliamentarians from throughout Europe around the shared values of democracy, the rule of law and human rights. Your visit to Strasbourg is incredibly symbolic because we are welcoming you premier the 20th anniversary of your country joining the Council of Europe. As you know, our Assembly supports the democratic change in Georgia since it joined the Council of Europe.

I congratulate the Georgian authorities and the Georgian people, because ministre the last two decades Georgia has trodden the long path to European integration sexisme supporting stronger democracy and prosperity. We are delighted to welcome you to the Chamber.

It is with great pleasure that I give you the floor. Madam President, ladies and gentlemen, Excellencies, distinguished members of the Assembly, I am honoured to address you in the house of democracy, human ministre and the rule of law.

We have just heard a beautiful piece of authentic Georgian polyphonic singing, where different voices come together in a complex union and embrace and enrich each other, developing and moving ahead. This is a strong marker of Georgian national identity, and when I think of being Georgian, this polyphony comes to sexisme mind first. Yesterday, Georgia marked 30 years since tragic sexisme. On 9 Aprila peaceful anti-Soviet demonstration demanding freedom and independence from the Soviet Premier was violently dispersed by the Soviet Army using tanks and guns on Rustaveli Avenue in the centre of Tbilisi.

I was very young then, but I still remember the event like it happened yesterday. On 9 Aprila small nation united to defend its freedom — the freedom of sovereign existence.

In those events, the Georgian people dared to exercise their right to freedom of assembly and freedom of speech in the Soviet Union. Their attempt was suppressed in bloodshed, but their fight for independence, freedom and democracy has not been lost. Two years after those tragic events took place, on the very same day, the Act of Re-establishment of Independence was signed.

With that fight and sacrifice, Georgia regained its European identity, which seemed so distant 30 years ago. Since those years, we have faced many other challenges, and despite all of them, we still have achieved a lot — we have achieved almost the impossible. The sexisme that my country has achieved in the last premier years belongs to both Georgia and the Council of Europe, and therefore we can both be proud of it.

Together we have created a country that has emerged as a true democracy between two continents, bridging Europe with Asia. In this challenging region, Georgia has an ambition to dictate peaceful rules of co-existence and create a sustainable model of democracy. In the last 20 years since accession to the Council of Europe, Georgia has managed a dramatic transformation, and today we are a country on the rise. Twenty years ago, Georgia had serious challenges, and upon accession we made a list ministre commitments.

Two years after those tragic events took place, on the very same day, the Act of Re-establishment of Independence was signed. With that fight and sacrifice, Georgia regained its European identity, which seemed so distant 30 years ago.

Since those years, we have faced many other challenges, and despite all of them, we still have achieved a lot — we have achieved almost the impossible. The success that my country has achieved in the last 20 years belongs to both Georgia and the Council of Europe, and therefore we can both be proud of it.

Together we have created a country that has emerged as a true democracy between two continents, bridging Europe with Asia. In this challenging region, Georgia has an ambition to dictate peaceful rules of co-existence and create a sustainable model of democracy. In the last 20 years since accession to the Council of Europe, Georgia has managed a dramatic transformation, and today we are a country on the rise. Twenty years ago, Georgia had serious challenges, and upon accession we made a list of commitments.

We pledged to create a truly democratic State, to strengthen the rule of law, to carry out judicial reform, to fight corruption, to fight torture and ill treatment, to guarantee freedom of speech and a free media, to protect minorities and to strengthen national human rights mechanisms. Georgia has demonstrated progress in all those directions, through close co-operation with the different bodies of the Council of Europe.

I would like to take this opportunity to express gratitude on behalf of the Georgian people to the Parliamentary Assembly, the Committee of Ministers, the European Court of Human Rights, the Congress of Local and Regional Authorities, the Venice Commission, the Office of the Commissioner for Human Rights and other human rights monitoring bodies.

As I said, we have achieved everything together. Let me elaborate on the major achievements that are worth your attention. After many years, Georgia has finally managed to establish a fair system of checks and balances and has made irreversible democratic progress. Our government became the first to refuse one-party domination.

Our new constitution requires us to introduce a fully proportionate electoral system from Meanwhile, Georgia is going through an important transitional period. This will create better political balance and give minority parities a better chance of winning seats in parliament. With the introduction of a proportional electoral system, governments will be required to make greater concessions in policy making.

This is our values-based choice, and we will never diverge from this path. We are proud that for the first time in history Georgia has elected a female president. We are writing a new chapter in our history. With the election of the new president, the new constitution came into force. Now, Georgia is a parliamentary democracy where, in my capacity as prime minister, I am accountable to parliament and its members, who are elected by the Georgian people.

As a result of the recent reforms, parliament has become stronger than ever. A strong parliament means robust oversight of the executive.

For that very reason, we understand the importance of being accountable to our population. We understand how important it is for every single citizen to be informed about our day-to-day initiatives and reforms, and we are determined to strive towards more development and more accountability. Just seven years ago, Georgia had serious challenges in the field of the rule of law and the functioning of an independent judiciary. We have made significant progress that is best measured here in Strasbourg.

In fact, the European Court of Human Rights is the best indicator of shortcomings and improvements in the field of human rights. More people have started to seek and find justice at a national level, with no need to go further to the European Court of Human Rights. That has been confirmed by the significant drop in the number of applications filed against Georgia in the Court: in , we had applications to the Court, but in we had only a quarter of that figure. On the execution side, the total number of Georgian cases closed by final resolutions of the Committee of Ministers is Since , applications to the constitutional court of Georgia by common courts have increased more than fivefold.

Before, the number of applications was literally zero. Let me repeat that: literally zero. In addition, in recent years we have opened court rooms to the media and ensured the full transparency of trials. Georgia has made immense progress in the fight against corruption and in ensuring the accountability and transparency of our government. In the s, Georgia was among the most corrupt countries, but today we are proud to be one of the least corrupt countries in the world.

Georgia is ranked No. Georgia is a proud member and former chair of the Open Government Partnership, a major international partnership with the aim of global openness, transparency and accountability.

Our government inherited a system of oppressive penitentiary machine, with the systematic practice of torture and ill treatment. The penitentiary system was failing, so we needed to take decisive measures.

The reforms carried out have drastically changed the situation in penitentiaries. As a matter of fact, the Georgian penitentiary system deserves its place in good human rights stories from the United Nations and the European Union. Georgia has transformed its attitude towards political freedoms.

Freedom of expression and the right to peaceful manifestation, which previously were often violated, are now fully respected.

Georgia has a vibrant civil society, a free media and Internet, and freedom of expression is fully respected. The unfortunate practice of violent dispersion of peaceful protests belongs to the past, and the government fully respects the right to assembly and manifestation. The justice system has become more responsive to hate crimes and discrimination, and protective mechanisms have become stronger.

Last but not least, Georgia has developed robust human rights mechanisms. We have achieved a lot, but we are determined to progress further. I often say that we have two main challenges in Georgia: occupation and poverty. This became my precept and serves as the basis of every reform or initiative that the government introduces in the country.

One such reform is truly revolutionary — I would say it is a real game-changer — and that is the reform of the education sector. Over recent decades, education had become a real bottleneck, and the development of human capital lagged behind the demands of a modern world. That will be ensured by legislation, so that every government that follows will be obliged to invest in the development of our human capital — the people who advance our country and made the values-based choice to support us in our European aspirations.

It is the development of human capital that will serve as the solution to our existing challenges. Only educated professionals will be able to raise our country to the heights that we envisage for our future generations. Despite all this progress, we still face major human rights challenges in our occupied territories. More than internally displaced persons cannot go back to their homes. Every day we have to deal with barbed-wire fences, the depopulation of occupied territories, grave human rights abuses and a general situation that is nothing but a humanitarian disaster, in every sense of the term.

The growing militarisation of the occupied regions is in full swing and depopulation is intensifying by the minute. Because of the grave humanitarian, economic and human rights situation, the population in the occupied regions has decreased by a factor of five or six since the start of the occupation.

As a result of the occupation, we have Russian military bases in the heart of Georgia. Today, we still deal with the threat of the abduction, torture and murder of Georgian citizens. Only several weeks ago, another Georgian citizen, Irakli Kvaratskheliya, was illegally detained. The details of his subsequent death are still obscure, with unclear circumstances.

One fact is clear: a Georgian citizen has been illegally detained in the illegally occupied territory, at a military base built illegally by the Russian Federation.

I thank the Parliamentary Assembly for backing and supporting the Otkhozoria-Tatunashvili list. We should all line up against the grave human rights violations to ensure that the deliberate disregard for the rule of law will never be tolerated. The Russian Federation tries to undermine our peaceful initiatives. With diversions of this kind, it tries to block all our efforts, and with ethnic discrimination it tries to fully eradicate the Georgian identity, but this will not happen.

We will never give up. With this initiative we seek to provide our population in the occupied territories with access to proper healthcare and education services, and to create opportunities for micro and small commerce and for entrepreneurship, so that they can feed their families and ensure their physical survival. The Russian Federation continues to ignore its obligations under the ceasefire agreement to withdraw its troops from our territories. We only believe in peaceful resolution of the conflict; that is our one and only position towards the resolution of the conflict.

Our joint victory will only come when our IDPs are able to return to their homes. Bridges between people will be fully restored. The rule of law and human rights will be ensured throughout the whole territory of Georgia. Today, from this stage, I would like to send a message to all our Ossetian and Abkhaz citizens: our every success is your success, and the only future that we see is together with you, united in peace and prosperity. I thank the Council of Europe for its unwavering support for the sovereignty and territorial integrity of my country, and for keeping the issue of the occupation of Georgian territories high on its political agenda.

I thank you all for the annual decisions of the Committee of Ministers on the issue and on the consolidated reports of the Secretary General. We greatly appreciate the close co-operation and co-ordination, especially in the direction of confidence-building measures and in the restoration of bridges between the divided communities.

We are bolstering people-to-people relations by insisting that we are one country, one sovereign and united European nation. In spring next year, we will host a peace forum in Georgia. Our goal is to contribute to peace and stability in the wider region, and therefore to give all the countries in the region the possibility to utilise the huge opportunities that have not yet been unleashed.

Georgia supports the efforts aimed at solving the current financial difficulties. However, the position of Georgia remains that non-payment by Russia should not become a factor or condition for changing the existing rules or procedures of the Parliamentary Assembly or the Statute of the Council of Europe. It should be particularly emphasised that the action plans of the Council of Europe remain a very important instrument in helping certain member States to fulfil the recommendations issued by the various independent human rights monitoring institutions of the Council of Europe.

It is important that the Council of Europe continues its work in both directions; on the one hand, it identifies shortcomings in member States through its monitoring institutions; and on the other hand, it continues to assist member States to rectify the shortcomings that are identified. Action plans are crucial, indeed critical, in that regard. Finally, ladies and gentlemen, in — 20 years ago — the Chairman of the Parliament of Georgia, the late Zurab Zhvania, spoke in this wonderful city of Strasbourg at the historic moment that Georgia joined the Council of Europe and he made his famous statement.

Since those historic words, 20 years have passed and symbolically this year we will take up the chairmanship of the Council of Europe, the Organisation that has been our principal supporter on our path. It is now our turn to accept this torch and pass it to future generations. Thank you — Gmadlob. Je dis bien: nul. Nous voulons que toutes les voix de nos citoyens soient entendues.

Il est mort dans des circonstances obscures. Nous en sommes reconnaissants. Thank you very much indeed, Prime Minister. A number of colleagues have expressed a wish to ask you questions, Prime Minister. Please may I remind colleagues that you should put a question and not make a statement, declaration or speech? Your question should be limited to 30 seconds, to enable everyone to take the floor.

You know how deeply we were involved in the process of your democratisation, with everything that we did. However, we observed the election and we have one question that arises from our observation of it — not only our observation, but that of the Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights.

We saw many irregularities and between the irregularities we also saw the violence. Can you assure us that in the future these kinds of things will not happen? And, if so, how can you ensure that? Et si oui, comment pouvez-vous vous en assurer? Thank you for the question. The last presidential election in Georgia was a historic milestone; after the election, we switched to parliamentary democracy.

Obviously, the biggest shortcoming that we observed in the election was a very polarised political environment. Unfortunately, Georgia is not the only example of that on our continent. You mentioned the real progress that you are making in the fight against corruption. However, there are still things to do, for sure. What do you say in response to those allegations?

If you look at the rankings prepared by the most reputable international organisation, you will see that Georgia is the leading country in our region, and of course we are motivated to take our success to another level. We also have a vibrant civil society and our motivation, of course, is to work very closely with it. Regarding reforms, I always say that there is no low-hanging fruit left in Georgia.

We have conducted very sophisticated and fundamental reforms, and the involvement of civil society in those reforms is very important; we understand that. Please be sure that we will continue to take our success to another level, and once again — let me repeat myself — the international rankings, which were prepared by the most reputable organisation, are very good evidence of that. Thank you, Sir, and it has been a great pleasure to work with colleagues of yours in the Council of Europe.

I will pick up where one of my colleagues left off. That is no cause for congratulation, but I appreciate that it may be a step on the road to full democracy. You have parliamentary elections coming up next year. How will you make sure that you become a full democracy? Georgia is a full democracy. We switched to a parliamentary democracy after the election of the President of Georgia.

You mentioned a very reputable magazine, but let me give you some other information, such as our success in the protection of human rights, our economic development and our transparency. I said that we are ranked number five in the open budget index, which measures important policy making by governments. We are No. But we understand that there are some shortcomings and we want to address them, using the recommendations of institutions that include the Council of Europe.

We are fully motivated to do so. The Georgian Parliament is working intensively to implement into our legislation the recommendations that we received from the OSCE on the presidential elections conducted last year. Please be assured that Georgia will take its success story to another level, with your support and recommendations.

My question concerns the recent elections in Georgia in November How in line with the rule of law do you think it is for a leader of a ruling party to pay bank loans for people from his own pocket? Do you think that such a gesture, and allegations relating to pressure on public sector employees, should, could or will be investigated by an independent body in Georgia?

Thank you for raising that topic. Let me give you some interesting figures. Georgia has a population of less than 4 million, but more than citizens were on the so-called black list. They had no chance of participating in the economic life of Georgia. That is a majority of our families. I initiated the idea before the election. In August , as Prime Minister I announced that we would implement the project in autumn , and we did.

It was one of the biggest problems in our economy and it created a systemic risk for our national economy. Georgia was recently upgraded by major international credit agencies, and one of the many reasons for that was the implementation of this project.

I assure you that the project has nothing to do with the election. Prime Minister, you said a lot about protecting human rights, but in , the organisers of the march into Tbilisi for the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia were forced to cancel the event due to threats from far-right extremists and concerns about the lack of police protection.

It is the latest in a long series of problems faced by the LGBTI community in exercising the right to freedom of assembly. What concrete actions will your government take to ensure that the LGBTI community can enjoy that basic right? As you know, several years ago the Georgian Parliament adopted the anti-discrimination law. That was a big step forward. The extremist groups you mentioned are marginalised groups, and such groups can be found in any country.

Please be assured that in legislation, human rights are protected at the highest level possible. We are proud of our achievements, and we are getting recommendations from our European friends to make that stronger. I go back to my major argument: legislation. We have taken strong steps in the right direction. If there are ways in which we should make our legislation stronger, we have the political will to do that.

The recent changes to our legislation are a strong guarantee that the protection of human rights in Georgia is of the highest level. I am pleased to recall that, since the restoration of independence, our two nations Azerbaijan and Georgia have further reinforced their historical friendship and have built strong co-operation.

Based on mutual trust, there have been successful regional energy projects such as the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan pipeline, or more recently the southern gas corridor. Through co-operation, together with Turkey, we provide a safe shipping of hydrocarbons from the Caspian basin to the European market. How can other countries contribute to the energy security of the European continent?

Azerbaijan is a strategic partner of Georgia. Together we can implement historic projects such as Baku-Tbilisi-Kars and Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan, which I have mentioned, the southern gas corridor and many others. We think that we are not fully utilising resources from the Caspian Sea. We can contribute more to the energy security of Europe, and we have dialogue with European colleagues. As you know, there are free capacities in Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan, and we will be happy to explore those opportunities together with Azerbaijan, to increase energy flow in our corridor.

Thank you, Mr Bakhtadze. We have come to the end of questions on behalf of political groups. Colleagues, I suggest that we now take three questions at a time, to allow as many of you as possible to take the floor. Thank you for your speech, Prime Minister.

Georgia is in the process of transitioning to a full parliamentary republic. According to the Georgian parliamentary delegation, the country has made comprehensive reforms and is preparing for more changes.

Would you share more details on that? Prime Minister, I understand that Georgia has made considerable progress on creating a regulatory and institutional framework for fighting corruption. There is, however, still a way to go. Prime Minister, congratulations on all your efforts. Statistics show that individual complaints from Georgian citizens to the European Court of Human Rights have reduced dramatically.

Can you tell us what is behind that? A second question: have you ever sent your ambassador in Azerbaijan to see Afgan Mukhtarli in prison, who was kidnapped in your country, and have you ever investigated the civil servants who were active in that kidnapping? Thank you for the questions. I mentioned that the last presidential election was a historical milestone for our nation for many reasons; one of them is that after the election, we switched to a parliamentary democracy.

Of course, the role of parliament has never been so strong in Georgia. The relationship and communication between the Government and Parliament of Georgia has never been so intensive. We believe, and our political team believes, that parliamentary democracy is the best model for Georgia to create a strong European State. The second question was about corruption. We have tremendous achievements in this regard, but of course we understand that we need more efficient mechanisms, and we are working on that with our international partners.

I provided you with information about our position in international rankings; I would like to give you information about our aspirations, too. We are trying to make Georgia a regional hub for international business, tourism, logistics and education, so we are very much focused on monitoring the position of Georgia in international rankings.

Fighting corruption is one of the major priorities. I mentioned that we are No. We have very strong positions in other major international rankings, but I assure you that our main goal is to be in the top three in all major international rankings. In-house web conferencing system 1. Index Translationum Institution International translation day Jefferson 1. Jobs 1. Just-published Korean court interpreter 1. Le Robert 1. LSF 1. Mabanckou Mo Yan 5.

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From www. Reactions 5. No comment yet. Are we to accept that the word misogyny is what some feminists choose it to mean, neither more nor less? Reactions 3. Misogyny definition to change after Gillard speech Prime Minister Julia Gillard's fiery speech about sexism and misogyny has even forced the word watchers to take note. The Macquarie Dictionary has announced it is broadening the definition of the word "misogyny".

As it stands, the reference book says misogyny is a hatred of women, the kind that's pathological. Reactions 2. Reactions 4. From tempsreel. Coalition attacks Macquarie for redefining 'misogyny' THE opposition has attacked the Macquarie Dictionary for deciding to water down the meaning of the word "misogyny" following Julia Gillard's use of the term to attack Tony Abbott. Reactions 8. Add wordnik-based synonyms and antonyms into the Dash via Unity Thesaurus scope Iloveubuntu: Ubuntu blog Add wordnik-based synonyms and antonyms into the Dash via Unity Thesaurus scope Submitted by razvi on October 16, - inShare Access weather informations in a matter of seconds, perform mathematical calculations directly in the Dash, etc, are actions available via Unity Utilities lens, lens that houses and exposes informations as generated by various sources, while remaining hidden without a dedicated icon on Dash's lens bar.

Reactions 6. Three Dictionary And Thesaurus Alternatives - Forbes Three Dictionary And Thesaurus Alternatives Dictionaries are hard to browse, and a thesaurus can be a dangerous tool for writers, especially when every word it shows you is longer than the one you originally searched.

Sometimes you need to find a related word, or maybe even a shorter word, but not exactly a synonym. In honor of Dictionary Day in the U. Visual Thesaurus Visual Thesaurus Visual Thesaurus is the perfect tool for those moments when the right word is on the tip of your tongue.

For example, none of the following set of terms was in the New Webster Encyclopedic Dictionary of the English Language in African-American, entitlement, environmentalism, Hispanic, multiculturalism, Native American, nonjudgmental, sexism, victimization.

A further sampling from now-widespread leftist terminology would include: feminism, Chicano, sensitivity training, homelessness, consciousness-raising, right-wing extremism, Islamophobia, bullying, male chauvinism, no-fault divorce, racial profiling, lifestyle, Christian fundamentalism, social safety net, bilingual education, sexual harassment, hate speech, underprivileged, same-sex marriage, and social justice — the politically correct synonym for socialism.

Those lists provide substitute diction for the censored words e. Reaction 1. Here, Skinner tells us the story of the dictionary that was referred to as "literary anarchy. Celebrate National Dictionary Day! Para elaborarlo dividieron el proceso en etapas.

From appdictions. Ask a lexicographer Every now and again, we like to share a few of the very interesting questions sent to us by fans of Oxford Dictionaries. From blog. From dictionary.

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Tweet Partager Reactions 5 No comment yet. Tweet Partager Reactions 3 No comment yet. Sign up to comment Misogyny definition to change after Gillard speech Prime Minister Julia Gillard's fiery speech about sexism and misogyny has even forced the word watchers to take note. Tweet Partager Reactions 2 No comment yet. Tweet Partager Reactions 4 No comment yet. Sign up to comment Coalition attacks Macquarie for redefining 'misogyny' THE opposition has attacked the Macquarie Dictionary for deciding to water down the meaning of the word "misogyny" following Julia Gillard's use of the term to attack Tony Abbott.

Tweet Partager Reactions 8 No comment yet. Sign up to comment Add wordnik-based synonyms and antonyms into the Dash via Unity Thesaurus scope Iloveubuntu: Ubuntu blog Add wordnik-based synonyms and antonyms into the Dash via Unity Thesaurus scope Submitted by razvi on October 16, - inShare Access weather informations in a matter of seconds, perform mathematical calculations directly in the Dash, etc, are actions available via Unity Utilities lens, lens that houses and exposes informations as generated by various sources, while remaining hidden without a dedicated icon on Dash's lens bar.

Tweet Partager Reactions 6 No comment yet. Sign up to comment Three Dictionary And Thesaurus Alternatives - Forbes Three Dictionary And Thesaurus Alternatives Dictionaries are hard to browse, and a thesaurus can be a dangerous tool for writers, especially when every word it shows you is longer than the one you originally searched.