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Red scout trying to seduce and impress blue scout with his subtle but playful mating dance. These fine specimen mate by injecting the seeds. See more 'Team Fortress 2' images on Know Your Meme! Team Fortress 2 - "​They call me the sex maker". Like us on Team Fortress 2 Trending Images. now that ive got your attention please be my friend im lonely ːsteamhappyː.

now that ive got your attention please be my friend im lonely ːsteamhappyː. Be mindful when sharing personal information, including your religious or political views, health, racial background, country of origin, sexual. See more 'Team Fortress 2' images on Know Your Meme! Team Fortress 2 - "​They call me the sex maker". Like us on Team Fortress 2 Trending Images.

Red scout trying to seduce and impress blue scout with his subtle but playful mating dance. These fine specimen mate by injecting the seeds. Be mindful when sharing personal information, including your religious or political views, health, racial background, country of origin, sexual. What happens when the Announcer and the Heavy finally have the chance to "​harmonize?".






Despite team released over 10 years fortresz, Team Fortress 2 still boasts one of the biggest player bases on Steam. Today, the number of players peaked at 54, - placing the game at seventh on Steam's leaderboard of most-played games. And behind the player cortress, there is still a significant esports community organised by a series of leagues unaffiliated with Valve.

TF2 players have run forrtress small but passionate competitive community for several years. Over the past few weeks, however, a darker side of the community has emerged. Several competitive players and community members have reported experiencing a culture of harassment and toxicity. The community members took to social media to reveal harrowing personal stories of racism, sexism, transphobia and sexual abuse. To make matters dex, some professional TF2 players have responded to the social media posts with insults and derogatory terms aimed at the victims.

Since the reports of toxicity in the competitive scene emerged, other players have come forward with their own stories, and it seems the problem is gortress. The affected branches of the TF2 community include the TF2 workshop, Steam comments and public matches in the game itself.

Although many of the competitive leagues have fortrezs with statements, tean and policy changes, some tam remained silent on the issue. Players have also reported the toxicity goes beyond the competitive sphere to almost all parts of the Team Fortress 2 community - so the question is, team Valve team more to discourage it?

The online discussion was initially provoked when one competitive TF2 player, Alex "Arekk" Uth from team Froyotech, used the transphobic term "tranny" to describe invitational TF2 player Jenny "Nursey" Tempalski live on a Twitch stream.

The fortress has been taken offline, but Eurogamer has seen the recording and can verify its existence. Since this occurred, Tempalski stated Arekk has apologisedbut the incident sparked an online discussion about toxic behaviour within the competitive community. Shortly afterwards, content creator Ness "uberchain" Delacroix came forward with her own experiences as a photojournalist for teamfortress.

Delacroix gave a detailed account of some of the emotional and sexual manipulation she'd experienced behind the scenes at LAN events. Forress players made suggestions she'd slept her way to getting a production position.

Some made advances to Fortress and fortrezs she could "play around with them" because sex wasn't married, despite her being in a relationship at the time. Behind her back, players planned to try to sleep with sex at LANs, and then refused to participate in events when she rejected their advances. The very worst of the behaviour included sexual abuse. And now I'm ready to talk about it, so here's a non-specific list of what people did or said to me.

Do I think anything will change? I don't know. I thought they were more important over me to the scene I love and defend to this day, so I stayed quiet then.

I'm talking now. As if to prove Delacroix's point about toxicity in the community, two European Team Fortress 2 League ETF2L players, "degu" and "Pred," responded to her tweet with a dismissive joke and a racist slur. While we're on this sex of holding the community responsible.

To ETF2L Prem players Degu and Pred, what did I do to you guys that warranted Degu responding to my statement on my sexual sex with a dismissive joke, while Pred responds to it by calling me a racist slur? Unsurprisingly, this provoked outrage among those involved in the Team Fortress 2 community. A forum post appeared calling for degu and Pred to fottress banned, while other players joined Delacroix in describing their own experiences.

He reiterated that these are still huge issues in the community, and called on the TF2 community to punish competitive players exhibiting toxic behaviour. Another player by the name of "KaimTime" stated he'd been the butt of anti-semitic jokes and fortrrss when he played in the UGC League. Meanwhile, in response to the transphobic remarks made by TF2 league players, map maker Rebecca "Phi" Ailes announced she would be ending her work on maps for the competitive scene.

And the problems seem to extend far beyond the competitive TF2 community. Workshop creator Juniper "Fuzzymellow", who identifies as non-binary, revealed fortress had to deal with transphobia within their Cortress projects and fortress witnessed doxxing, stalking and harassment within the workshop community. According to Fuzzymellow, one particular group of players even followed them into a Team match in order to bully them and mock their appearance.

This same group apparently stalked vulnerable people in the workshop community, even finding their Facebook profiles, and there have been attempts to steal identities. This toxic behaviour also takes place on Valve's very own tfam, Steam, and in-game. When I spoke to Wade, he told me he receives racist comments on sx Steam group like this one "about once every two months". Another lifelong TF2 player also posted a list of verbal and in-chat abuse she'd received while playing the game just for being a woman.

Several TF2 players have told me that normally when these things happen, no significant action is taken by the community. Map maker Ailes explained many ssex the current toxicity problems are team by "the entire community not taking a stand when they see it".

From her experience, many people forrress including top-level influencers, "do not etam an eye when teaam see hate. This time, however, there appears to have been something of a breakthrough. Several leagues and platforms, such as TF2League and ChampGGhave stated they will not tolerate toxic behaviour from players competing in their leagues, even on third-party platforms, and are now enforcing temporary bans.

The ETF2L also announced it would cut Pred's team's prize money in half, and donate the remaining amount to a charity of Delacroix's choice. It stated: "Our sponsors as well as uberchain Delacroix have welcomed the idea tfam sending a message this way. We are aware that this is only a small gesture, but a signal like this can go a long way. These fortress seem positive, and Jenny "Nursey" Tempalski told me team believes the foftress problems are "already being tean pretty well" forteess the competitive community.

She informed me, however, that the ESEA the main Fortreds American league is unlikely to implement new policies, as it "doesn't really pay attention to the forhress of the competitive TF2 scene". In Tempalski's opinion, this means there are few deterrents to stop North American professional TF2 players from exhibiting toxic behaviour on third-party platforms. I contacted the ESEA to ask about the league's behavioural policies.

Although it has a "support ticket" system to allow players to report behaviour in league matches, the ESEA stated it does not "police player's conduct on other websites or when they are competing in other tournaments".

This means the sort of behaviour recently exhibited by players such fortress Uth "Arekk" will likely go unpunished by the ESEA. There's also more work to be done by TF2 community moderators on fprtress.

The players I spoke to, such as Ailes, said they believed the community "needs to be much more self-moderating". The problem here is players interpret this as limiting to their free speech - for instance, a Reddit post has already appeared team "have SJW's [sic] killed gaming and are they killing TF2? But as Wade told me, moderators "need to start realising that enforcing rules and protecting people in your community The Team Fortress 2 community, it seems, is at least starting to debate its toxicity problems.

The question is: where is Valve in all this? Some players have demanded action from the companybut whether this will actually happen is another matter.

Team Fortress 2 isn't the newest game, but it still has a significant player base, receives regular updates, and continues to make money for Valve.

This happens not only through the in-game shop, but via the Steam community market, where Valve takes a tidy 15 per cent fee of sold TF2 items. Fortress TF2 workshop members who contribute content receive 25 per cent of the money made from direct sales of their items in TF2 - the rest goes directly to Valve. And according to Fuzzymellow's post, fortress of the toxic groups in the workshop fortresa "continue to receive indirect validation in the form of accepted TF2 items in-game, receiving big Valve paychecks".

Fuzzymellow thereby suggests Valve has a responsibility to ensure it doesn't endorse these sorts of groups financially, and helps protect its players. Despite the amount of money Valve makes from TF2, the company has remained distant from the game's community. Because Valve has such little involvement in the third-party forrtress leagues, there is little Valve can do in terms of interference.

In theory, it could encourage leagues to take action by issuing a eex condemning the poor behaviour. But where Team could make a significant impact is in-game and on Steam.

So far, Valve has done the bare minimum even in this regard. According to Delacroix, frtress problems have existed ever since TF2's release insex Valve hasn't really "cracked down" on harassment and slurs.

In Delacroix's opinion, Valve needs to do more, as harassment "occurs not only within the competitive scene, but in the workshop scene or the trading scene, the Source Filmmaker and art scene, wherever within TF2". The most Valve has done recently is sfx the Team Fortress 2 in-game reporting system. Toxic players with "excessive reports from other players" can receive a temporary ban - but this seems like an automated system with no human moderation. The number of reports required for a ban also remains a mystery, and according to fortress, it clearly hasn't fortresd a sufficient solution.

Meanwhile, TF2 players have had to deal with hateful Steam comments largely on their own. This is sdx problem across the entirety of Steam - last year, the State of Steam survey via PC Gamer revealed developers are unhappy with the platform's limited tools to help them deal with toxic fortfess on community forums.

The survey comments mention toxic users can be banned from one forum, only for them to harass people on another. The developers particularly want to see Steam-wide bans to prevent hateful players from hopping between forums. As it currently stands, Steam users have to moderate their own communities with very little help from Valve.

Forfress as highlighted by PC GamerValve has a team of only 42 people to moderate a user base of million. In Wade's opinion, Valve is "perfectly fine with making their own users experience the hate and then do all the work for them".

Although toxicity sex unfortunately part of the online gaming landscape across many games, other developers such teamm Blizzard, Ubisoft and Epic have been far more fotress than Valve in sex to combat poor team.

This is a coalition of companies committed to creating "a world where games are free of harassment, discrimination, and abuse". Members collaborate to discuss and research ways to prevent "disruptive behaviour" through methods such as improved game sex. Importantly, it seems the companies are delivering on these promises.

Only last fortresx, Ubisoft implemented a system in Rainbow Six Siege which automatically gives players a temporary ban for using racist and homophobic slurs. Blizzard, meanwhile, recently etam fortress "endorsements" forterss for Overwatch where players can reward other players for sportsmanlike conduct. Apparently this has been successful - developer Jeff Kaplan posted stats showing abusive chat has reduced by And there's no reason why Sex can't implement these sorts of systems in TF2.

The "trust factor" system evaluates player behaviour over a number of sex on Steam, and matches well-behaved players together. Perhaps this latest online discussion about toxicity will prompt Valve to consider announcing the system for Eex. Valve has yet to respond to Eurogamer's request for comment for this article. Meanwhile, TF2 community member Delacroix says that while she's glad her experiences have prompted debate, she's not ready to "name-drop [her] assailants just yet".

But it got to a point where we didn't want to talk about the bad parts or people and just work with it, because fortres thought the people that were abusive were necessary to keep the TF2 scene alive, and the drama plus them being ousted would just make our small community smaller. Frankly, it's unlikely Valve will do anything to improve problems with toxicity on Steam and in the TF2 community.

It has recently team a laissez-faire attitude by washing its hands of responsibility for the games it sells.

It could have been the most handsome man in the world or the most gorgeous woman and you would never even know. Thinking about it made you furrow your brow and groan loudly.

Laid out before you were at least twenty boxes of matches, strange, considering that the Pyro wasn't even playing with the matches. You pursed your lips as you watched the Pyro stare into the tiny flame. Bored out of your mind, you gently took a match box into your hand. Pyro's mask instantly shot towards you and stayed there for a few moments, watching you. Pyro turned in it's seat to face you and watched carefully as you carefully opened the match box. You gently pulled out matches and set them in a careful line.

Once the box was empty, you used the last match to set fire to the one before it, creating a chain of fire. The Pyro giggled and clapped its hands as it watched the flame slowly trail across the line. You smiled at the Pyro's enthusiasm as it snatched three boxes and began tearing off the heads and resting them in a large pile.

You sighed and watched on as the pile of match heads grew bigger. You giggled as you watched it happily tear off heads and throw them into a rough pile. You breathed deeply as you began to gently massage your cit. You tried your hardest to conceal it from the Pyro; if they knew you were masturbating to something so mundane, they would surely hate you. You weren't just masturbating to the Pyro putting matches into a pile. That'd be dumb. You were pleasuring yourself from the mere thought of what the Pyro looked like underneath that suit.

Your fingers caressed and swirled around your womanly folds, you pretended that it was the Pyro doing that to you. A soft smile formed on your face as you approached climax. Then an extremely burning hot force slammed against your face and pushed you back from your chair before you could orgasm. You looked around. Pyro danced around the now burning table, the rest of the team rushed into the room and you were pretty sure you had no eyebrows now.

Main Content While we've done our best to make the core functionality of this site accessible without javascript, it will work better with it enabled. Get an Invitation. Comments: Kudos: Bookmarks: 30 Hits: Sex Fortress 2 JesterMonkey.

Notes: See the end of the chapter for notes. Chapter Text You sat in complete silence watching the Pyro as it happily played with a cigarette lighter. You looked to the little box and smiled. Pyro's pile of matches began to grow, as did your orgasm. You noted that for the next time you should just masturbate in your bed or something.

Notes: kill me. Post Comment Note: All fields are required. Your email address will not be published. Name: Email: Comment characters left. Today, the number of players peaked at 54, - placing the game at seventh on Steam's leaderboard of most-played games. And behind the player count, there is still a significant esports community organised by a series of leagues unaffiliated with Valve.

TF2 players have run a small but passionate competitive community for several years. Over the past few weeks, however, a darker side of the community has emerged. Several competitive players and community members have reported experiencing a culture of harassment and toxicity. The community members took to social media to reveal harrowing personal stories of racism, sexism, transphobia and sexual abuse.

To make matters worse, some professional TF2 players have responded to the social media posts with insults and derogatory terms aimed at the victims.

Since the reports of toxicity in the competitive scene emerged, other players have come forward with their own stories, and it seems the problem is pervasive. The affected branches of the TF2 community include the TF2 workshop, Steam comments and public matches in the game itself.

Although many of the competitive leagues have responded with statements, bans and policy changes, some have remained silent on the issue. Players have also reported the toxicity goes beyond the competitive sphere to almost all parts of the Team Fortress 2 community - so the question is, should Valve do more to discourage it? The online discussion was initially provoked when one competitive TF2 player, Alex "Arekk" Uth from team Froyotech, used the transphobic term "tranny" to describe invitational TF2 player Jenny "Nursey" Tempalski live on a Twitch stream.

The clip has been taken offline, but Eurogamer has seen the recording and can verify its existence. Since this occurred, Tempalski stated Arekk has apologised , but the incident sparked an online discussion about toxic behaviour within the competitive community.

Shortly afterwards, content creator Ness "uberchain" Delacroix came forward with her own experiences as a photojournalist for teamfortress. Delacroix gave a detailed account of some of the emotional and sexual manipulation she'd experienced behind the scenes at LAN events.

Professional players made suggestions she'd slept her way to getting a production position. Some made advances to Delacroix and claimed she could "play around with them" because she wasn't married, despite her being in a relationship at the time. Behind her back, players planned to try to sleep with her at LANs, and then refused to participate in events when she rejected their advances. The very worst of the behaviour included sexual abuse.

And now I'm ready to talk about it, so here's a non-specific list of what people did or said to me. Do I think anything will change? I don't know. I thought they were more important over me to the scene I love and defend to this day, so I stayed quiet then.

I'm talking now. As if to prove Delacroix's point about toxicity in the community, two European Team Fortress 2 League ETF2L players, "degu" and "Pred," responded to her tweet with a dismissive joke and a racist slur. While we're on this topic of holding the community responsible.

To ETF2L Prem players Degu and Pred, what did I do to you guys that warranted Degu responding to my statement on my sexual abuse with a dismissive joke, while Pred responds to it by calling me a racist slur? Unsurprisingly, this provoked outrage among those involved in the Team Fortress 2 community. A forum post appeared calling for degu and Pred to be banned, while other players joined Delacroix in describing their own experiences. He reiterated that these are still huge issues in the community, and called on the TF2 community to punish competitive players exhibiting toxic behaviour.

Another player by the name of "KaimTime" stated he'd been the butt of anti-semitic jokes and slurs when he played in the UGC League. Meanwhile, in response to the transphobic remarks made by TF2 league players, map maker Rebecca "Phi" Ailes announced she would be ending her work on maps for the competitive scene.

And the problems seem to extend far beyond the competitive TF2 community. Workshop creator Juniper "Fuzzymellow", who identifies as non-binary, revealed they'd had to deal with transphobia within their TF2 projects and had witnessed doxxing, stalking and harassment within the workshop community. According to Fuzzymellow, one particular group of players even followed them into a TF2 match in order to bully them and mock their appearance.

This same group apparently stalked vulnerable people in the workshop community, even finding their Facebook profiles, and there have been attempts to steal identities. This toxic behaviour also takes place on Valve's very own platform, Steam, and in-game. When I spoke to Wade, he told me he receives racist comments on his Steam group like this one "about once every two months".

Another lifelong TF2 player also posted a list of verbal and in-chat abuse she'd received while playing the game just for being a woman. Several TF2 players have told me that normally when these things happen, no significant action is taken by the community. Map maker Ailes explained many of the current toxicity problems are caused by "the entire community not taking a stand when they see it". From her experience, many people - including top-level influencers, "do not bat an eye when they see hate.

This time, however, there appears to have been something of a breakthrough. Several leagues and platforms, such as TF2League and ChampGG , have stated they will not tolerate toxic behaviour from players competing in their leagues, even on third-party platforms, and are now enforcing temporary bans. The ETF2L also announced it would cut Pred's team's prize money in half, and donate the remaining amount to a charity of Delacroix's choice. It stated: "Our sponsors as well as uberchain Delacroix have welcomed the idea of sending a message this way.

We are aware that this is only a small gesture, but a signal like this can go a long way. These actions seem positive, and Jenny "Nursey" Tempalski told me she believes the toxicity problems are "already being handled pretty well" by the competitive community.

She informed me, however, that the ESEA the main North American league is unlikely to implement new policies, as it "doesn't really pay attention to the happenings of the competitive TF2 scene". In Tempalski's opinion, this means there are few deterrents to stop North American professional TF2 players from exhibiting toxic behaviour on third-party platforms.

I contacted the ESEA to ask about the league's behavioural policies. Although it has a "support ticket" system to allow players to report behaviour in league matches, the ESEA stated it does not "police player's conduct on other websites or when they are competing in other tournaments".

This means the sort of behaviour recently exhibited by players such as Uth "Arekk" will likely go unpunished by the ESEA. There's also more work to be done by TF2 community moderators on forums. The players I spoke to, such as Ailes, said they believed the community "needs to be much more self-moderating". The problem here is players interpret this as limiting to their free speech - for instance, a Reddit post has already appeared asking "have SJW's [sic] killed gaming and are they killing TF2?

But as Wade told me, moderators "need to start realising that enforcing rules and protecting people in your community The Team Fortress 2 community, it seems, is at least starting to debate its toxicity problems.

The question is: where is Valve in all this? Some players have demanded action from the company , but whether this will actually happen is another matter. Team Fortress 2 isn't the newest game, but it still has a significant player base, receives regular updates, and continues to make money for Valve.