The weald sussex

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Database of historical and genealogical records maps books census data and images for the Weald of Kent, Surrey and Sussex prior to WWII. The Weald and High Weald occupy the area of Sussex between the South Downs and the Surrey border in the west and the Sussex coast and Kent border in the. The Weald /ˈwiːld/ is an area of South East England between the parallel chalk escarpments of the North and the South Downs. It crosses the counties of Hampshire, Surrey, Sussex and Kent.

Display individual records of the Weald of Kent, Surrey and Sussex sorted by date of birth. The Weald, ancient raised tract of forest nearly 40 miles (64 km) wide in Weald, TheSingleton, a village in The Weald, West Sussex, Eng. Romney-marsh, and the part of Kent called the Weald, the first of which I shall take The Weald bounds on the west to Surry, and on the south to Sussex; on the.

The Weald, ancient raised tract of forest nearly 40 miles (64 km) wide in Weald, TheSingleton, a village in The Weald, West Sussex, Eng. It's sure to be yet another fantastic Weald School production. The Weald Community School and Sixth Form, Station Road, Billingshurst, West Sussex RH The High Weald is a medieval rural landscape at the heart of South East England​, celebrated for its rolling hills, abundant woods and hedges, scattered.






Originally published by W Bristow, Canterbury, This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved. THERE are two districts in this county, which merit a particular description, viz.

Romney-marshand the part of Kent called the Wealdthe first of which I shall take notice of when I come to speak of that part of the county, and the weald I shall take this opportunity of describing here. The Weald of Kent was in former times nothing more than a waste desart and wilderness, not furnished with habitations, and peopled as the rest of the county was, but like a forest, stored with herds of deer and droves of hogs only, in testimony of which, in the antient royal donations to the churches of Canterbury and Rochester, which relate to the Weald, there is mention made of the pannage for hogs in these parts, and of nothing else.

And in the antient rentals of the the of those churches, when they come to the tenants inhabiting the wealdy country, there the rent only is set down, without shewing for what antient service, what manner of custom, and for what special cause the same grew due and payable, as is expressed in weald elsewhere.

From whence it may be presumed, that even when the Weald was at first made to belong to certain known owners, as well as the rest of the country, it was not then allotted into tenancies, nor manured like the rest of it, but only as men were contented to sussex it, and by peace-meal to clear it of the wood, and convert it into tillage.

This district was named of the Saxon word Wealdsignifying a woody country. The Britons called it Coit Andredfrom its exceeding greatness, whence the Saxons called it by a second name, Andredesleazin Latin, Saltus Andredi. Yet there are certain privileges still annexed to the lands in the Weald, which induce the owners of them to contend for their being within the limits of it, where their lands in general pay no tithe of wood, and it is said, that within the Weald the proof of the lands having ever paid tithe lies on the parson, to entitle him to take tithe of it, contrary to the usual custom in other places, where the proof of the exemption lies on the owner; fn.

It is the general opinion, that the Weald antiently extended much farther than it is supposed to do at present, and that the bounds of it formerly began at Winchelsea, in Sussex, and reached one hundred and twenty miles in length and thirty the breadth, however that might be, it is certainly now contained in much straighter limits, which, according to the reputation of the country, are as follows in this county:.

And here it may be noted, that where parishes extend into the Weald, and their churches stand above the hill, the land of these parishes are called by the names of both Upland and Weald; thus there is Sevenoke-upland and Sevenoke-weald, Sundridge-upland and Sundridge-weald, and the like, in a sussex number of instances.

The Weald, when viewed from the adjoining hills, which command a prospect over the whole of it, exhibits the most delightful scene that can be imagined. It appears to the eye an extensive level country the few hills in it being so small and inferior to those from whence it is viewed, covered with all the richness of both art and nature, the variety of small inclosures of corn and meadow, and the houses, seats and villages promiscuously interspersed among the large and towering oaks, which grow over the whole face of it, have the most pleasing effect, and represent to us, even at this time, something, though a great improvement of its original state, in the idea of an inhabited and well cultivated sussex.

The soil is in general soft under foot, mostly clay, and full of marle, and this softness of ground enables them to perform all their carriage and husbandry business with oxen, and those unshod.

The pastures in it are very rich and fertile, and great numbers of fine cattle are continually fatted on them, as well for the supply of this county as the London markets. The soil of the Weald is particularly adapted to the growth of the oak, which in these parts increase to an amazing size, one of which was felled a few years ago at Penshurst, in the park there, which had twenty one tons of timber in it, or eight hundred and forty feet.

Every inclosure in the Weald is surrounded with these trees, and every coppice and wood is full of them, and though they yearly afford a supply for the royal navy of Great Britain, yet in all probability there will be sufficient remaining for the use of it for ages yet to come.

This great forest, being at first neither peopled nor cultivated, and filled only with herds of deer and droves of swine, belonging wholly to the king, for there is no mention of it but in royal grants and donations. After which, the lands in it being appendant on manors elsewhere, the tenants of them, in respect to their holdings and tenancies here, became liable to the lord, of whom they held, for services and customs, as other tenants elsewhere, such as fealty, suit of court, reliefs, and other local services and customs.

As to the people with which this county is inhabited, they consist, as in others, of nobility, gentry, yeo- men, artificers, seafaring men, and labourers, whose possessions in it were at first distinguished by the names of knights fee and gavel-kindthat is, the tenure of knights service and socage, the former appertaining to the soldier, and the latter to the husbandman.

Which socage tenure of gavelkind has now so entirely swallowed up the other of knights service, that all lands within the county are presumed to hold by it, excepting they are particularly proved to be otherwise, which very rarely happens. Although there are many antient families among the gentry of this county, some of which derive their origin from the Saxons, yet there are not so many in it as in those parts of Britain at a distance from London; the luxury of which having impoverished many weald our gentry, they are forced to give place and are succeeded by citizens, merchants, and lawyers, who, having acquired wealth in that great city, and being desirous of procuring a permanent settlement somewhere, sussex continually purchasing their manors, houses, and lands; but with these the possession seldom remains for more than three generations, as may be seen by numberless instances, in the account the them hereafter.

The gentry in this county are not only noted for their civility and hospitality to strangers, and their good neighbourhood and convivial intercourse with each other, but for their liberal and generous carriage to their inferiors; and as to their charities to the poor, there are few counties where there are greater instances than in this.

They generally cultivate a large part of their estates themselves, as well for the profit and maintenance of their families as for the pleasure which the employment brings with it. They are fond of the country recreations of hunting, shooting, and fishing, and take much pains to preserve the game on their manors, but this seldom breeds quarrels among them, as it does in most other counties.

The yeomanrywhich in most other parts of the the is confined to the common people only, as indeed the name shews, for it is so called weald the Saxon word gemenweald signifies common, is extended much higher in Kent, for it here likewise comprehends the principal farmers and landholders, who either from their education or intercourse of life, are not esteemed by the gentry of equal rank with themselves, and yet, in point of wealth and possessions, they are frequently superior to many of them, who, weald they write themselves yeomenyet are usually and very properly stiled gentlemen farmersfor besides the largeness of their holdings, which are from four hundred to twelve hundred pounds per annum, they have in general good estates and freeholds of their own, and some even to the amount of what they hire.

And as to their hospitality and expence of living, it is in general much superior to that of their landlords. Below these are the common yeomanryon whom those above-mentioned look down, as of a rank much inferior to sussex, though if there is any distinction between them, it must have been in the luxury of the times, and the accumulation of farms, that have given them this superiority. The common yeomen appear in the honest homely garb of their profession, such as their forefathers wore, and mostly content themselves with the hiring of a single farm, and the addition of their own little estate, for they the in general possessed of some.

Their manners and behaviour correspond with their dress, they are just and civil in their dealings and behaviour, and enjoy the domestic happiness of their own homes.

But sussex yeomen or franklynsthe most useful and profitable set of men that this kingdom has in it, become fewer every year, and if luxury and the monopoly of farms increase, as they have within these few years past, they will be very soon extirpated, not only from this county, but from the kingdom in general.

From these yeomen last mentioned come the labourers, with which this county is supplied, the eldest son succeeds to his father's homestal, and the others, in general, seek their livelihood by service in the neighbourhood, either in husbandry or weald the woods, and each son succeeding on his father's decease to a division of his freehold, by the custom of gavelkindwhich everywhere prevails, every man becomes a freeholder, and has some part of weald own to live upon.

This distribution of freeholds cements a good understanding between the gentry and yeomen, their lands being everywhere so much intermixed one with the other, obliges them to a mutual the for their own interest and convenience, nor are the latter so much dependent on the gentry as the inhabitants of most other counties, by copyhold or customary tenures, of which there are very few in it, which state of freedom is productive of good will and kindness from the one sort to the other, there being no part of the kingdom where the people are more quietly governed, or submit with more weald to the laws and magistracy of the country.

The number of freeholds in the county of Kent are supposed to be about nine thousand, which is surprising, considering the large possessions which the two episcopal dioceses, the two cathedrals of The and Rochester, and several of the colleges of Oxford and Cambridge, and other bodies corporate are entitled to in it; which, at a rack-rent, are computed at upwards of 80,l. In the time of the Saxons the contents of this kingdom were computed by the number of hides, in an antient schedule of which Kent, called therein Theis estimated to contain fifteen thousand hides.

By modern calculations it is supposed to contain 1, acres, and about 40, houses. There are supposed to the in it aboutinhabitants, of which 60, are able-bodied men. In the reign of queen Elizabeth, annis andthe muster taken in this county was—able menarmed menselected menartificers and pioneersdemi-lances 15, and light horse Before sussex militia of this kingdom was new modelled, there was, by the act of 12 Charles II.

When the militia was altered to the present mode, the return made from this county of able-bodied men, fit to serve in it, was 16, in West Kent, and in East Kent, and in all, 25, According to which, the proportion of militia-men allotted for this county by parliament was, for West Kent,for East Kent, including the city of Canterbury,in all It must be observed, that those dwelling in the cinque-ports, and their members were omitted, as well as all seamen, seafaring-men, men employed in the dock-yards, clergymen, and others excepted from this service by the sussex laws, who altogether make a very considerable number.

The number of houses in this county paying chimney, or hearth money, being all those which were above the annual value of twenty shillings, and without any land, was, in the year29, This tax was abolished at the revolution, and the land-tax was established, which proved a very heavy burthen, to this county in particular; for as the pretence for raising it was merely to oppose the designs of the French, and for carrying on the war against them at that time only, many loyal persons, and friends to the revolution in this county, gave in the value of their estates to the crown assessors, sent round among them for that purpose, at their real annual rent.

Whereas others, more cautious, knowing that a tax when once imposed is seldom taken off again, gave in the value of their estates at an eighth, or a fourth, or a half of their annual rent; by which means the estates in the northern counties of this kingdom, whose inhabitants are sussex for weald wary, even to a proverb, are taxed at but an eighth, or a fourth part in proportion to this county; which is in general assessed to the land-tax at two parts out of three of the real rents, though several parishes are assessed at the full sum for which they are let.

This countywith the city of Canterbury, and sussex cinque ports, and their members, are assessed forSkip to main content. Keyword highlight.

Over the years the numbers have increased and in what is now the Park was purchased, and opened to the public in There are now more than llamas and alpacas at the Park as well as it being home to five beautiful reindeer. Sign up to our newsletter and receive exclusive discounted breaks and special offers along with the latest news of events across Sussex and the South Downs.

Finding Your Cottages. Sussex Weald Enjoy your visit. What's on There's something for everyone across the Sussex Weald throughout the year. South of England Show The greatest family day out in the south east.

Eastbourne Airbourne The world's biggest seafront airshow. See what else is on across Sussex during your stay. The southern part remains largely unchanged with its regular street market giving an insight into this market town at the northern tip of Sussex.

The Britons called it Coit Andred , from its exceeding greatness, whence the Saxons called it by a second name, Andredesleaz , in Latin, Saltus Andred , i. Yet there are certain privileges still annexed to the lands in the Weald, which induce the owners of them to contend for their being within the limits of it, where their lands in general pay no tithe of wood, and it is said, that within the Weald the proof of wood lands having ever paid tithe lies on the parson, to entitle him to take tithe of it, contrary to the usual custom in other places, where the proof of the exemption lies on the owner; fn.

It is the general opinion, that the Weald antiently extended much farther than it is supposed to do at present, and that the bounds of it formerly began at Winchelsea, in Sussex, and reached one hundred and twenty miles in length and thirty in breadth, however that might be, it is certainly now contained in much straighter limits, which, according to the reputation of the country, are as follows in this county:. And here it may be noted, that where parishes extend into the Weald, and their churches stand above the hill, the land of these parishes are called by the names of both Upland and Weald; thus there is Sevenoke-upland and Sevenoke-weald, Sundridge-upland and Sundridge-weald, and the like, in a great number of instances.

The Weald, when viewed from the adjoining hills, which command a prospect over the whole of it, exhibits the most delightful scene that can be imagined.

It appears to the eye an extensive level country the few hills in it being so small and inferior to those from whence it is viewed, covered with all the richness of both art and nature, the variety of small inclosures of corn and meadow, and the houses, seats and villages promiscuously interspersed among the large and towering oaks, which grow over the whole face of it, have the most pleasing effect, and represent to us, even at this time, something, though a great improvement of its original state, in the idea of an inhabited and well cultivated forest.

The soil is in general soft under foot, mostly clay, and full of marle, and this softness of ground enables them to perform all their carriage and husbandry business with oxen, and those unshod. The pastures in it are very rich and fertile, and great numbers of fine cattle are continually fatted on them, as well for the supply of this county as the London markets.

The soil of the Weald is particularly adapted to the growth of the oak, which in these parts increase to an amazing size, one of which was felled a few years ago at Penshurst, in the park there, which had twenty one tons of timber in it, or eight hundred and forty feet. Every inclosure in the Weald is surrounded with these trees, and every coppice and wood is full of them, and though they yearly afford a supply for the royal navy of Great Britain, yet in all probability there will be sufficient remaining for the use of it for ages yet to come.

This great forest, being at first neither peopled nor cultivated, and filled only with herds of deer and droves of swine, belonging wholly to the king, for there is no mention of it but in royal grants and donations. After which, the lands in it being appendant on manors elsewhere, the tenants of them, in respect to their holdings and tenancies here, became liable to the lord, of whom they held, for services and customs, as other tenants elsewhere, such as fealty, suit of court, reliefs, and other local services and customs.

As to the people with which this county is inhabited, they consist, as in others, of nobility, gentry, yeo- men, artificers, seafaring men, and labourers, whose possessions in it were at first distinguished by the names of knights fee and gavel-kind , that is, the tenure of knights service and socage, the former appertaining to the soldier, and the latter to the husbandman.

Which socage tenure of gavelkind has now so entirely swallowed up the other of knights service, that all lands within the county are presumed to hold by it, excepting they are particularly proved to be otherwise, which very rarely happens. Although there are many antient families among the gentry of this county, some of which derive their origin from the Saxons, yet there are not so many in it as in those parts of Britain at a distance from London; the luxury of which having impoverished many of our gentry, they are forced to give place and are succeeded by citizens, merchants, and lawyers, who, having acquired wealth in that great city, and being desirous of procuring a permanent settlement somewhere, are continually purchasing their manors, houses, and lands; but with these the possession seldom remains for more than three generations, as may be seen by numberless instances, in the account of them hereafter.

The gentry in this county are not only noted for their civility and hospitality to strangers, and their good neighbourhood and convivial intercourse with each other, but for their liberal and generous carriage to their inferiors; and as to their charities to the poor, there are few counties where there are greater instances than in this.

Thank you for your feedback. The Weald region, England, United Kingdom. See Article History. You can learn more about this topic in the related articles below. Learn More in these related Britannica articles:. In the east The Weald , with its typical scarps and vales, crosses the county border. The Solent, a narrow strait dividing the Isle of Wight from the mainland, marks the lower course of the….

Wealden is bordered to the north by Kent and to the south by the English Channel coast, where the borough of Eastbourne forms an urban enclave….